Lissa

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1205

written-beast:

you know you have a book problem when you open your bag and

image

Reblogged 11 hours ago from writersrelief
135

medieval-women:

Christine de Pizan

Author, historian, poet, philosopher

Born 1364 or 1365 – Died 1430 (age 65 - 66)

Claim to fame: An advocate for women’s education, Christine is the first European woman known to have made her living as a writer.

Born the eldest child of the personal physician to King Charles V of France, Christine was well educated and benefited from access to the King’s vast library.

Christine was married at 15 and widowed just 10 years later. After her husband’s death, she turned to writing to support herself and her family, serving as a court writer for several dukes as well as Charles VI of France.

Her 1405 book, ‘La Cité des Dames’ (‘Book of the City of Ladies’), catalogued female accomplishment and helped establish her popularity. This book is considered by many as the inaugural text in the field now known as women’s studies.

Christine completed forty-one works during her career. Her work contradicted negative female stereotypes and countered unjust slander of women within other literary texts. She argued that women have the same aptitudes as men and thus the right to the same education. Christine’s influence in the otherwise male-dominated field of rhetorical discourse lead Simone de Beauvoir to acknowledge her as the first woman to “take up her pen in defence of her sex”.

Boston College Magazine

Wiki

Reblogged 11 hours ago from annetheseamaiden
363

ilovereadingandwriting:

Start writing today…

Reblogged 11 hours ago from ilovereadingandwriting

Writing the dramatic death scene

143621

muffincoti:

1lostone:

maxkirin:

In your head:

image

In paper:

image

this made me laugh so hard because it’s so accurate.

every fanfic that I want to write

Reblogged 15 hours ago from genedoucette
90

amandaonwriting:

Editing Comic

Source for Comic

Reblogged 16 hours ago from amandaonwriting
304

I’m not a delinquent, but I’m totally rockin’ the recluse thing.

(Source: thetinhouse)

Reblogged 20 hours ago from amandaonwriting
1014
"Start telling the stories that only you can tell, because there’ll always be better writers than you and there’ll always be smarter writers than you. There will always be people who are much better at doing this or doing that – but you are the only you."

Neil Gaiman (via maxkirin)

Reblogged 21 hours ago from shinyhill
18381
"If you are a writer, and you have a novel idea that you are excited about writing, write it. Don’t go on message boards and ask random Internet denizens whether or not something is allowed. … Who is the writer here? YOU ARE. Whose book is it? YOUR BOOK. There are no writing police. No one is going to arrest you if you write a teen vampire novel post Twilight. No one is going to send you off to a desert island to live a wretched life of worm eating and regret because your book includes things that could be seen as cliché.

If you have a book that you want to write, just write the damn thing. Don’t worry about selling it; that comes later. Instead, worry about making your book good. Worry about the best way to order your scenes to create maximum tension, worry about if your character’s actions are actually in character; worry about your grammar. DON’T worry about which of your stylistic choices some potential future editor will use to reject you, and for the love of My Little Ponies don’t worry about trends. Trying to catching a trend is like trying to catch a falling knife—dangerous, foolhardy, and often ending in tears, usually yours.

I’m not saying you shouldn’t pay attention to what’s getting published; keeping an eye on what’s going on in your market is part of being a smart and savvy writer. But remember that every book you see hitting the shelves today was sold over a year ago, maybe two. Even if you do hit a trend, there’s no guarantee the world won’t be totally different by the time that book comes out. The only certainty you have is your own enthusiasm and love for your work. …

If your YA urban fantasy features fairies, vampires, and selkies and you decide halfway through that the vampires are over-complicating the plot, that is an appropriate time to ax the bloodsuckers. If you decide to cut them because you’re worried there are too many vampire books out right now, then you are betraying yourself, your dreams, and your art.

If you’re like pretty much every other author in the world, you became a writer because you had stories you wanted to tell. Those are your stories, and no one can tell them better than you can. So write your stories, and then edit your stories until you have something you can be proud of. Write the stories that excite you, stories you can’t wait to share with the world because they’re just so amazing. If you want to write Murder She Wrote in space with anime-style mecha driven by cats, go for it. Nothing is off limits unless you do it badly.

And if you must obsess over something, obsess over stuff like tension and pacing and creating believable characters. You know, the shit that matters. There are no writing police. This is your story, no one else’s. Tell it like you want to."

Rachel Aaron (via relatedworlds)

Yeah, so, this answers a lot of asks I get. It’s also why YW focuses on technique and style, and less on content and research.

(via clevergirlhelps)

Reblogged 21 hours ago from fuckyeahcharacterdevelopment
15

shaestel:

I’m glad that you, OP, at least think your opinion is worth something because literally nobody else does and nobody cares to hear it. 

Jane is an enigma. Her reign was so short, and her recorded acts so few that we don’t get a clear picture of what she was like. Her silence over the fall of Anne Boleyn makes her seem cold-blooded (as though she had a choice) and her obedience makes her seem passive and weak.

On the whole, history hasn’t been kind to her. She wasn’t as educated or charming as the woman she replaced. Her one talent we know of was her embroidery, at which was supposedly highly skilled - some examples of her work survived up to the 19th century. (But “women’s work” such as this isn’t something we value as highly as other pursuits.) She’s “boring” when compared to the sparking, well-read Anne Boleyn.

We’re told that Queen Jane excluded ladies in waiting from her presence because their garments didn’t contain enough pearls, and she insisted they dress in conservative English fashions like the gable hood instead of the French hood her predecessor had favored. But these actions are understandable when put in contemporary context.

Her two major recorded actions put her in a more favorable light. Jane asked for Princess Mary to be restored in the succession - a request that was rather rudely slapped down by the king. She risked his anger again by pleading on her knees for mercy toward the captured rebels of the Pilgrimage of Grace. On this occasion, Henry darkly reminded Jane of what had happened to the last queen who dared to meddle in his affairs. Not long afterward, she died in childbirth, giving Henry his sought-for heir.

Had Jane Seymour lived after Edward’s birth, we might know her better, but instead, we only get a glimmer of her through a distant, obscured lens. Why is she disliked? Because we know so little of her. She’s quiet, subdued after Anne’s glittering reign. She’s prudish and snobbish. She watches with pitiless eyes as Anne is killed to make room for her. We know nothing of the terror she might have felt after watching Anne’s fall, but still summoning up the courage - somehow - to approach the throne to plead for the rebels’ mercy.

We fall in love with these people who lived so long ago… People we have never met and only know through biased sources, but we feel like we know them. And we hotly defend them against their enemies. How can we condemn that love? It’s what keeps us driving forward in our quest to learn more, to discover anything we can about these people and the times in which they lived. We need that passion for history.

(Source: real-tudor-confessions)

Reblogged 1 day ago from shaestel
2820
"Some writers need a while to charge their batteries, and then write their books very rapidly. Some writers write a page or so every day, rain or shine. Some writers run out of steam, and need to do whatever it is they happen to do until they’re ready to write again."

Neil Gaiman (Entitlement issues)

(Source: fictionwritingtips)

Reblogged 1 day ago from fixyourwritinghabits
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