Lissa

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898

medieval-women:

theatlantic:

Archaeologists Find World’s Oldest Bra

If a bra feels like a medieval torture device* to you, you are correct about one thing: They are, in fact, medieval (whether they are also torture really depends upon the fit). 

[Image: Institute for Archaeologies, University of Innsbruck]

This bra has been dated from between 1390 and 1485 CE.

More accurately, it’s probably the remains of a “pair of bodies,” from which the modern term “bodice” originates. What we’re looking at is just shreds of the fabric that survived, which giving it the appearance of a modern bra.

The original garment probably looked more like this:

Reblogged 3 hours ago from annetheseamaiden
441

(Source: weareteachers)

Reblogged 3 hours ago from the-queens-court
581

Reblogged 3 hours ago from intjblog

Community Post: 80 Signs You're An INTJ

220

typicalschemer:

Full of gifs of Robert Downey Jr, Tom Hiddleston, Sherlock…;)

Reblogged 3 hours ago from typicalschemer
328

intj-thoughts:

hashtag-thoughts by - acodetojoy

Reblogged 4 hours ago from intj-thoughts
836

intj-thoughts:

thought by - mycfsjourney

Reblogged 4 hours ago from intj-thoughts
215

british-history:

Beatrix Potter’s Birthday

28 July 1866

Today is the birthday of Beatrix Potter, born on this day in British history, 28 July 1866. She is most remembered for her work as an author and illustrator of children’s books. Her most famous creation, Peter Rabbit, is still a popular and well loved character today.

Reblogged 6 hours ago from intimesgonebyblog
88

british-history:

Thomas Cromwell is Executed

28 July 1540

It was on this day in British history, 28 July 1540, that Thomas Cromwell was executed on Tower Hill. Cromwell had become an enemy of King Henry VIII in the midst of the political turmoil that accompanied Henry’s tumultuous reign. Henry VIII went ahead and married Catherine Howard on the very same day that Cromwell was beheaded.

Reblogged 6 hours ago from mygoodqueenbess
34

goodqueenbesstudor:

After several false starts at engaging the Spanish Armada off the coast of Calais, the English fleet set eight ships on fire and sent them off towards the Spanish fleet at midnight on July 28, 1588. The fireships sent the Spanish fleet scattering, forcing them to break formation as they scrambled out to sea. While not defeated, the Spanish fleet was severely handicapped. Not only did they have fewer ships but the ships they did have were less maneuverable compared to the English ships and their artillery more difficult to fire. All this meant the Spanish were at a great disadvantage when they faced the English off Gravelines the next morning. Beaten and being chased, the Spanish took advantage of a favorable wind and headed north with the English in pursuit till they were forced to abandon the chase at Firth of Forth. The Armada would attempt to return to Spain only to be continually battered by storms along the Irish coast. In the end, more men died at sea than during battle and only 67 ships (of 130) and less than 10,000 men would make it back to Spain. 

Reblogged 6 hours ago from mygoodqueenbess
223
"In general…there’s no point in writing hopeless novels. We all know we’re going to die; what’s important is the kind of men and women we are in the face of this."

Anne Lamott (via writingquotes)

Reblogged 6 hours ago from writingquotes
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