Lissa

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34

tiny-librarian:

On April 21st, 1509, Henry VII died of tuberculosis at Richmond Palace. He was succeeded by his second son, Prince Henry, who would become the infamous Henry VIII.

This sketch is interesting because it shows the king in his ceremonial bed of estate (wearing his crown, no less!), surrounded by the great lords of the kingdom. William FitzWilliam (second to left at bottom) closes the dead king’s eyes, holding his staff of office in his other hand. The figure with the crown at top left is the Bishop of Winchester, Richard Fox, who was also Lord Privy Seal.

The picture was drawn by Sir Thomas Wriothesley, who may have not actually been present when the king died. They kept up the pretense he was alive for another two days while arrangements were made (that is, the lords scrambled for positions of power or protection in the reign of the new king).

Reblogged 2 days ago from one-mistress-and-no-master

Sneak Peek Sunday ~ How to Get Ainsley Bishop to Fall in Love by T.M. Franklin

1

itlnbrt:

Sneak Peek Sunday ~ How to Get Ainsley Bishop to Fall in Love by T.M. Franklin

Sneak Peek Sunday Banner

Today, we get a sneak peek at the fun upcoming release from T.M. Franklin!
Ainsley-3D-Paperback.png Summary

Seventeen-year-old Oliver Wendell Holmes (Yes, his parents are just that peculiar, but his brother’s name is Sherlock,…

Reblogged 3 days ago from itlnbrt
119206

theodd1sout:

This will help you write good.

Reblogged 3 days ago from its-a-writer-thing

Lissa Bryan: Two Historical Fiction authors Review #VIKINGS Episode VIII

72

ebookfriendly:

25 paper-scented perfumes and candles ⇢ http://ebks.to/1hbjWup

Reblogged 1 week ago from writersrelief
206

millionsmillions:

Do people enjoy writers like Pynchon and Nabokov in part because they’re so odd? A new paper suggests that we tend to like art when we believe its creator is eccentric. The Atlantic reads through a study that’s a bit of a strange one.

Reblogged 1 week ago from yeahwriters
183

(Source: robyn-larue)

Reblogged 1 week ago from writersrelief

A Writer's Responsibility

1565

theroadpavedwithwords:

Being a writer is awesome. You get to make up worlds, fill them with characters you love, and then kill them off one by one (because making your readers hurt is a special kind of drug). However, there is a lot of personal responsibility that comes with writing as…

Reblogged 1 week ago from its-a-writer-thing
630
"Many of us have this idea that we’re meant to be perfect as writers. Instead, try thinking of your writing as akin to your fingerprints. They are what they are – unique patterns that exclusively represent you – not good or bad or better or worse than anyone else’s.
Instead of trying to perfect your writing, then, strive to get acquainted with this pattern and become more and more proficient at expressing it. There is no endpoint in this process, and we will never arrive at “perfect.” So why not give up the chase right now, and just enjoy the resonance and beauty of our humble, flawed writing as it is?"

Sage Cohen (via writingquotes)

Reblogged 1 week ago from writingquotes
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